Juvenile Detention Is Asinine Exception to Social Distancing

coronavirus: Double exposure of young boy with sad eyes and abstract virus strain model over back of head

KDdesignphoto/Shutterstock

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Right now I’m almost sure that there is a 14- or 15-year-old crying from inside a jail cell at the Cook County [Ill.] Juvenile Temporary Detention Center (CCJTDC) — home of the world’s first juvenile court house established in 1899. There are many reasons this young person could be crying — they can’t have their mother come and visit as she has every week for the last few months. Maybe the young person was sure they were going to court but is told the courts that have the ability to free them is closed for 30 days. Or maybe, just maybe, the young person is sick from the contracting the coronavirus (COVID-19). 

On any given day at the CCJTDC there are boys and girls who will be herded into the CCJTDC through the intake process and thereafter placed inside a “housing pod” — a space less than the size of a full basketball court with 12 to 15 youth locked inside. There are 30 of these housing pods inside the CCJTDC — a four-story concrete and iron building on Chicago’s Westside. 

Paul Pearson (headshot), smiling man with short dark hair in dark jacket, plaid shirt and striped tie

Paul Pearson

Dr. Anne Spaulding, a professor of epidemiology and medicine at Emory University, was quoted in the Los Angeles Times as saying, “There’s nothing to make us think that a COVID-19 cannot spread through a crowded juvenile facility as quickly as it could spread through a cruise ship.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the virus can easily spread in dense places — in a packed subway car, for example, or at a rally or concert. 

There is now mounting concern that COVID-19 will find its way inside our correctional facilities. This   claim is not hyperbole, according to an article in The Hill: “An employee at New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility tested positive for the coronavirus … with two other’s tests pending.” A staffer at Monroe Correctional Complex in Washington state has tested positive

And finally there is Dr. Robert Greifinger, “who has spent 25 years working on health care issues inside the nation’s prisons and jails.” Social distancing “isn’t so simple behind bars … crowding issues, ventilation issues, security issues where people have to be checked and monitored fairly frequently.” 

In response to the mounting evidence that detention facilities are the next breeding ground for the pandemic, the chief justice of the CCJTDC postponed most cases through April 15.

Survived so much already

These preventative measures, however well intended, will continue to put lives at risk — young lives — many of whom have made it through drug and gun wars, physical and sexual abuse, and mental and emotional abuses of every kind and survived. What no one with authority is willing to concede at this point is that social distancing needs to apply to youth detention centers right now. 

COVID-19 is like no other issue the courts or detention centers have seen before. Thousands of young people are at risk as they sit inside a cesspool detention facility waiting to be infected. Here we have no other choice and must call for the lifesaving measure on behalf of our detained youth.  

It is asinine that law and order has taken precedence over common sense. With the introduction of COVID-19 into the global lexicon we are also become increasingly aware of the term “social distancing.” Extraordinary precautions are being taken by our government leadership and agencies to ensure that as many people practice social distancing as possible. 

The business community has also stepped in to help combat COVID-19 concerns by facilitating remote work options for employees and closing brick and mortar locations until further notice. Even our schools, administrators, faculty and staff at every level of education across the nation are not exempt from the impacts of social distancing due to COVID-19. 

In our lifetimes most of us have never experienced anything similar to the health precautions taken to curtail the spread of COVID-19. This is of particular interest to those of us who advocate and lend voice for detained youth who are experiencing forms of marginalization and systemic trauma

There is an interest divergence occurring here where property takes priority over social distancing that can curtail the spread of COVID-19 and impact the wellbeing of us all. (Juvenile detention is “not considered appropriate for status offenders and youth” who commit technical probation violations. But almost 4,000 youth are held in Cook County detention centers for these same low-level offenses.) Thus the approximately 200 boys and girls are essentially waiting for COVID-19 to find its way into the CCJTDC. Maybe some young person arrested for stealing or fighting will bring in COVID-19? 

Maybe some correctional officer will bring COVID-19 into the space? Maybe even a judge will usher in COVID-19? I can’t be sure which of these options will take hold. What I am absolutely sure of is that COVID-19 will enter the CCJTDC. So let’s find practical solutions to make sure our kids aren’t there when it arrives. 

Paul Pearson is a Doctor of Education student at DePaul University, where he also received a Masters of Jurisprudence degree in public interest law with a focus on juvenile jurisprudence. He is also the founder of a volunteer organization, DuSable Community Coalition, focused on reducing recidivism as we find alternatives to youth detainment throughout the United States.

The post Juvenile Detention Is Asinine Exception to Social Distancing appeared first on Youth Today.


Juvenile Detention Is Asinine Exception to Social Distancing

coronavirus: Double exposure of young boy with sad eyes and abstract virus strain model over back of head

KDdesignphoto/Shutterstock

.

Right now I’m almost sure that there is a 14- or 15-year-old crying from inside a jail cell at the Cook County [Ill.] Juvenile Temporary Detention Center (CCJTDC) — home of the world’s first juvenile court house established in 1899. There are many reasons this young person could be crying — they can’t have their mother come and visit as she has every week for the last few months. Maybe the young person was sure they were going to court but is told the courts that have the ability to free them is closed for 30 days. Or maybe, just maybe, the young person is sick from the contracting the coronavirus (COVID-19). 

On any given day at the CCJTDC there are boys and girls who will be herded into the CCJTDC through the intake process and thereafter placed inside a “housing pod” — a space less than the size of a full basketball court with 12 to 15 youth locked inside. There are 30 of these housing pods inside the CCJTDC — a four-story concrete and iron building on Chicago’s Westside. 

Paul Pearson (headshot), smiling man with short dark hair in dark jacket, plaid shirt and striped tie

Paul Pearson

Dr. Anne Spaulding, a professor of epidemiology and medicine at Emory University, was quoted in the Los Angeles Times as saying, “There’s nothing to make us think that a COVID-19 cannot spread through a crowded juvenile facility as quickly as it could spread through a cruise ship.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the virus can easily spread in dense places — in a packed subway car, for example, or at a rally or concert. 

There is now mounting concern that COVID-19 will find its way inside our correctional facilities. This   claim is not hyperbole, according to an article in The Hill: “An employee at New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility tested positive for the coronavirus … with two other’s tests pending.” A staffer at Monroe Correctional Complex in Washington state has tested positive

And finally there is Dr. Robert Greifinger, “who has spent 25 years working on health care issues inside the nation’s prisons and jails.” Social distancing “isn’t so simple behind bars … crowding issues, ventilation issues, security issues where people have to be checked and monitored fairly frequently.” 

In response to the mounting evidence that detention facilities are the next breeding ground for the pandemic, the chief justice of the CCJTDC postponed most cases through April 15.

Survived so much already

These preventative measures, however well intended, will continue to put lives at risk — young lives — many of whom have made it through drug and gun wars, physical and sexual abuse, and mental and emotional abuses of every kind and survived. What no one with authority is willing to concede at this point is that social distancing needs to apply to youth detention centers right now. 

COVID-19 is like no other issue the courts or detention centers have seen before. Thousands of young people are at risk as they sit inside a cesspool detention facility waiting to be infected. Here we have no other choice and must call for the lifesaving measure on behalf of our detained youth.  

It is asinine that law and order has taken precedence over common sense. With the introduction of COVID-19 into the global lexicon we are also become increasingly aware of the term “social distancing.” Extraordinary precautions are being taken by our government leadership and agencies to ensure that as many people practice social distancing as possible. 

The business community has also stepped in to help combat COVID-19 concerns by facilitating remote work options for employees and closing brick and mortar locations until further notice. Even our schools, administrators, faculty and staff at every level of education across the nation are not exempt from the impacts of social distancing due to COVID-19. 

In our lifetimes most of us have never experienced anything similar to the health precautions taken to curtail the spread of COVID-19. This is of particular interest to those of us who advocate and lend voice for detained youth who are experiencing forms of marginalization and systemic trauma

There is an interest divergence occurring here where property takes priority over social distancing that can curtail the spread of COVID-19 and impact the wellbeing of us all. (Juvenile detention is “not considered appropriate for status offenders and youth” who commit technical probation violations. But almost 4,000 youth are held in Cook County detention centers for these same low-level offenses.) Thus the approximately 200 boys and girls are essentially waiting for COVID-19 to find its way into the CCJTDC. Maybe some young person arrested for stealing or fighting will bring in COVID-19? 

Maybe some correctional officer will bring COVID-19 into the space? Maybe even a judge will usher in COVID-19? I can’t be sure which of these options will take hold. What I am absolutely sure of is that COVID-19 will enter the CCJTDC. So let’s find practical solutions to make sure our kids aren’t there when it arrives. 

Paul Pearson is a Doctor of Education student at DePaul University, where he also received a Masters of Jurisprudence degree in public interest law with a focus on juvenile jurisprudence. He is also the founder of a volunteer organization, DuSable Community Coalition, focused on reducing recidivism as we find alternatives to youth detainment throughout the United States.

The post Juvenile Detention Is Asinine Exception to Social Distancing appeared first on Youth Today.


New maps of Malaysian Borneo reveal worsening carbon losses along forest edges

Tropical forests are heavily fragmented as they are cleared for agricultural expansion and logging. Forest fragmentation leads to declines in carbon storage beyond just those trees that are cleared—the remaining forest at the edge of each clearing experiences environmental alterations such as increased sunlight and decreased soil moisture that can impact growing conditions for trees. These “edge effects” describe habitat disturbances that can lead to decreased tree growth and increased mortality, which change forest structure over time.

National Youth Gang Survey Program Grant

OUR GRANT OPPORTUNITIES: Youth Today’s grant listings are carefully curated for our subscribers working in youth-related industries. Subscribers will find local, state, regional and national grant opportunities.

THIS GRANT’S FOCUS: Youth Gangs, Youth Crime, Juvenile Justice, Youth Welfare, Safety
Deadline:
May 25, 2020

“This solicitation seeks applications for funding to design, pilot test, and implement a national survey of law enforcement agencies in order to illuminate the magnitude of youth gang activity and law enforcement responses to it. Study objectives will include: 1) developing a sampling plan and collecting data from a nationally representative sample of U.S. law enforcement agencies; 2) producing accurate and reliable national estimates of gang presence, gang membership, gang-related crime in urban, suburban, and rural communities across the United States; 3) acquiring detailed data about the characteristics of these crimes; 4) analyzing how the prevalence and characteristics of such crimes, as well as gang presence and membership have changed over time; and 5) obtaining information about law enforcement strategies for gang prevention, intervention and suppression.”

Funder: National Institute of Justice
Eligibility:
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS (other than institutions of higher education), nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS (other than institutions of higher education), for profit organizations other than small businesses, public and state controlled institutions of higher education, city or township governments, county governments, state governments, special district governments, Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized), others.
Amount:
Up to $1,000,000
Contact:
Link.


>>> CLICK HERE to see all of Youth Today’s GRANT LISTINGS

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National Youth Gang Survey Program Grant

OUR GRANT OPPORTUNITIES: Youth Today’s grant listings are carefully curated for our subscribers working in youth-related industries. Subscribers will find local, state, regional and national grant opportunities.

THIS GRANT’S FOCUS: Youth Gangs, Youth Crime, Juvenile Justice, Youth Welfare, Safety
Deadline:
May 25, 2020

“This solicitation seeks applications for funding to design, pilot test, and implement a national survey of law enforcement agencies in order to illuminate the magnitude of youth gang activity and law enforcement responses to it. Study objectives will include: 1) developing a sampling plan and collecting data from a nationally representative sample of U.S. law enforcement agencies; 2) producing accurate and reliable national estimates of gang presence, gang membership, gang-related crime in urban, suburban, and rural communities across the United States; 3) acquiring detailed data about the characteristics of these crimes; 4) analyzing how the prevalence and characteristics of such crimes, as well as gang presence and membership have changed over time; and 5) obtaining information about law enforcement strategies for gang prevention, intervention and suppression.”

Funder: National Institute of Justice
Eligibility:
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS (other than institutions of higher education), nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS (other than institutions of higher education), for profit organizations other than small businesses, public and state controlled institutions of higher education, city or township governments, county governments, state governments, special district governments, Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized), others.
Amount:
Up to $1,000,000
Contact:
Link.


>>> CLICK HERE to see all of Youth Today’s GRANT LISTINGS

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NM Children and Family Health Program Grants

OUR GRANT OPPORTUNITIES: Youth Today’s grant listings are carefully curated for our subscribers working in youth-related industries. Subscribers will find local, state, regional and national grant opportunities.

THIS GRANT’S FOCUS: Child/Youth Health, Child/Youth Welfare, Nutrition, Physical Activity, Safety
Deadline:
May 31, 2020

“Healthy Kids, Healthy Families (HKHF) is a Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Mexico grant initiative designed to improve the health and wellness of children and their families across the state of New Mexico. HKHF is part of an ongoing commitment to invest and partner with nonprofit organizations that offer sustainable, measurable programs in the following areas:

  • Nutrition
  • Physical Activity
  • Disease Prevention and Management
  • Supporting Safe Environments.”

Funder: Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Mexico
Eligibility:
“The organization must hold a 501 (c)(3) tax status. The grant must primarily target individuals in New Mexico. The program must be measurable and demonstrate how the goals will be met as defined in the grant proposal.”
Amount:
Unspecified
Contact:
Link.


>>> CLICK HERE to see all of Youth Today’s GRANT LISTINGS

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WY Youth Conservation Education and Job Training Program Grants

OUR GRANT OPPORTUNITIES: Youth Today’s grant listings are carefully curated for our subscribers working in youth-related industries. Subscribers will find local, state, regional and national grant opportunities.

THIS GRANT’S FOCUS: Job/Career Training, Environmental Education, Civic Engagement, Youth Development
Deadline:
May 18, 2020

“This program’s projects provide employment for participants and opportunities to learn about and gain work experience in public lands and natural resources management while promoting long term interest in public lands stewardship and the BLM. The BLM Youth Program assists the BLM with diversifying the workforce while exposing participants to the complex cultural and natural resource issues faced by National Conservation Lands managers.”

Funder: Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
Eligibility:
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS (other than institutions of higher education), nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS (other than institutions of higher education), Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized), Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized).
Amount:
$8,000 – $40,000
Contact:
Link.


>>> CLICK HERE to see all of Youth Today’s GRANT LISTINGS

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GA Women and Girls Life Improvement Program Grant

OUR GRANT OPPORTUNITIES: Youth Today’s grant listings are carefully curated for our subscribers working in youth-related industries. Subscribers will find local, state, regional and national grant opportunities.

THIS GRANT’S FOCUS: Women/Girls Welfare, Women/Girls Development, Education, Health, Gender Issues/Equality
Deadline: May 31, 2020

“Our goal is to make a positive impact on the lives of women and their children. The program/project for which you seek funding will improve the lives of women and/or children in one or more of the following areas: health, education, economic independence, social well-being, human rights. The grant will be used for special projects or capital improvement that can be sustained by the organization after the grant allocation. The grant may consider a limited amount to be used for salary, overhead, or other operating expenses for a new program. Preference will be given to programs and projects that can be fully funded by the $100,000 grant and are not reliant on other sources of funding to be successful.”

Funder: Ribbons of Hope
Eligibility: “A Georgia-based 501(c)(3) agency or organization. Agency or organization will have at least three years of financial records and an annual operating budget of at least $500,000 (in-kind donations can be included).”
Amount: $100,000
Contact: Link. 


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